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Great Dane Chihuahua Mix: A Guide To The Rarest Designer Dog  - PawSafe
Dog Breeds

Great Dane Chihuahua Mix: A Guide To The Rarest Designer Dog 

Photo of Tamsin De La Harpe

Written by Tamsin De La Harpe

Great Dane Chihuahua Mix A Guide To The Rarest Designer Dog 

The Great Dane Chihuahua mix blurs the line between what we know as possible and impossible. These mixes come from the Chihuahua and the Great Dane, and it’s hard to conceive that they’re possible. We have science to thank for achieving such a feat.

The parents are from opposite sides of the size spectrum, with Chihuahuas as the smallest and Great Danes as the largest. So what do you expect from such a wild combination of breeds, both physically and temperamentally?

This article explores the wild card that’s the Dane Chihuahua mix. While these dogs may exist, they’re so rare it’s highly unlikely you will ever come across one. But if you’re curious, then let’s dive in.

How Does a Great Dane Chihuahua Exist?

This mix is impossible to achieve naturally due to the insane size difference between the parent breeds. For one, a female Chihuahua is too small to carry a Great Dane’s puppies to term, and everything from the mating to the pregnancy would be potentially fatal. So this is out of the question.

To achieve a first-generation Chihuahua Great cross (called the F1 generation), you would need to artificially inseminate a female Great Dane with a male Chihuahua’s sperm, as a natural mating between these two dogs is unlikely to the point being impossible.

Not to mention that AI reproduction is costly, necessitating breeders to charge higher premiums on their pups.

It is also highly unlikely that a Great Dane female can successfully raise Great Dane Chihuahua mix puppies due to their small size. They may have problems feeding from such a big mother and will be extremely prone to accidental injury or death if she steps or lays on them. 

So if someone does want to breed this mix, they will need to hand-raise the puppies. This would mean taking the puppies away from their mother at birth.

As you can see, there are already ethical issues involved in creating this kind of “designer dog.” 

Other Chi mixes like Jack-ChisChigis, and Chi Huskies are much more feasible in size. However, you can still get a loving Chi Dane companion from a reputable breeder. 

What Does a Chi Dane Look Like?

  • Height: 15 to 21 inches (38 to 51 cm)
  • Weight: 30 to 50 pounds( 13 to 22 kg)
  • Lifespan: 8 to 10 years
  • Coat: Black, fawn, brindle, blue (faded gray), white, chocolate, occasionally merle
  • Eyes & Nose: light or dark depending on coat

A Chi Dane will be more than twice the size of an ordinary Chihuahua but way smaller than a Great Dane. They will have pretty short legs on a larger body, almost like a Corgi or Dachshund, but not nearly as extreme. 

A Chi Dane’s body is impressively balanced despite coming from two wildly different-sized breeds. They maintain the Great Dane’s floppy ears and can have the Chi’s apple or deer head. They mostly have short coats but can be fluffy if a long-haired Chihuahua parent is used.

Generally, looking at a Chi Dane will remind you of a Great Dane that never stops being a puppy. Some, however, can look more like an overgrown Chihuahua.

General Care and Maintenance of a Chihuahua Great Dane Mix

  • Hypoallergenic: No 
  • Shedding: Daily moderate shedding
  • Exercise: 30 to 60 minutes
  • Temperament: Very variable. These dogs could be gentle or feisty depending on the day, affectionate, loyal, protective
  • Trainability: Moderately trainable

Energy and Training 

Chi Danes can be relatively energetic. They are playful, and their bodies are built for a reasonable amount of activity. They need at least a 30-minute daily walk with additional playtime and other activities.

Housing Needs

These dogs live well in apartments and smaller spaces because their small size and moderate energy levels let them. What matters is reaching their daily exercise requirements. 

Food & Diet 

Healthy Chi Danes do well with diets for medium-sized dogs, depending on their size. They need a high-protein diet (25 to 30%) because of the Chihuahua parent’s high metabolism. The amount of food to feed depends on the weight of individual mixes. 

The Great Dane parent can introduce a deep chest, increasing the mix’s risk of GDV or bloat. It’s best to divide meals into 2 to 3 portions and wait a while after feeding for vigorous activity. Your vet will advise you on the right diet for your Chi Dane, considering all possible health conditions.

Grooming needs

Grooming a Chihuahua Great Dane mix is quite straightforward, needing only the essentials: shampoo, pin brushes or rubber glovesclippers, and ear solution. You need to brush their teeth and coats at least twice every week and bathe them once a month. 

Chihuahua Great Dane Mix Health Issues 

We can dedicate an entire page to the possible health conditions in this mixed breed. The Chihuahua increases the breed’s hardiness, but it will not make this cross exempt from health problems.

Hip dysplasia is the number one health issue in these mixes where the hip sockets don’t connect properly. Heart problems like mitral valve disease, patent ductus arteriosus, or PDA are also incredibly common. 

There aren’t enough Chihuahua Great Dane mixes in the world to create a detailed health profile. However, certain health conditions typical in the parent breeds can give you a rough idea. These include the following:

  • Hip and elbow dysplasia 
  • Cancer, like osteosarcoma prevalent in Great Danes
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy and other heart issues
  • Bloat
  • Wobbler syndrome
  • Collapsing tracheas
  • Valvular disease
  • Intervertebral Disk Disease (IVDD)

Temperament 

Great Dane Chihuahua mixes can be similar to either parents or a mix of both temperamentally. They are friendly, gentle, loyal, affectionate, lovable, and sweet. You can get a calm mix or a lively and hyper one like the Chihuahua parent.

They can display the famous Great Dane’s calm and laid-back traits or get skittish and feisty when they don’t get what they want. They can develop separation anxiety if you leave them alone for too long. Their intellect makes them relatively easy to train, but they can occasionally get stubborn. 

Where Can I Get a Great Dane Chihuahua Mix?

These dogs are tough to find because only a few breeders breed them. Artificial insemination can make them even more expensive. You may need to consult a reputable breeder you know for referral to a proper Chi Dane breeder. You can pay about $3000 for these unique pups if not more. It’s improbable that you’ll find such a rare dog in a shelter.

Other Notable Chihuahua and Great Dane Mixes 

These mixes make more sense because the parents are physically more similar. 

  • Jack Chis (Jack Russell Terrier Chihuahua Mix)
  • Cheagle (Beagle Chihuahua Mix)
  • Chigi (Corgi Chihuahua Mix) 
  • Chipoo (Chihuahua Poodle Mix) 
  • Giant Danesky (Siberian Husky Great Dane Mix)
  • Great Retriever (Great Dane Golden Retriever mix)
  • Labradane (Labrador Great Dane mix)
  • Boxane (Boxer Great Dane Mix)

Final Thoughts 

Chi Danes are rare dogs with unique temperaments and appearances. They are hard to come by because the extreme size necessitates artificial insemination to produce offspring. Only a few breeders specialize in this breed, so expect to go through quite the hassle to find one.

Meet Your Experts

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Tamsin De La Harpe

Author

Tamsin de la Harpe has nearly two decades of experience with dogs in rescue, training, and behavior modification with fearful and aggressive dogs. She has worked closely with veterinarians and various kennels, building up extensive medical knowledge and an understanding of canine health and physiology. She also spent two years in the animal sciences as a canine nutrition researcher, focusing on longevity and holistic healthcare for our four-legged companions. Tamsin currently keeps a busy homestead with an assortment of rescue dogs and three Bullmastiffs.

Tamsin de la Harpe has nearly two decades of experience with dogs in rescue, training, and behavior modification with fearful and aggressive dogs. She has worked closely with veterinarians and various kennels, building up extensive medical knowledge and an understanding of canine health and physiology. She also spent two years in the animal sciences as a canine nutrition researcher, focusing on longevity and holistic healthcare for our four-legged companions. Tamsin currently keeps a busy homestead with an assortment of rescue dogs and three Bullmastiffs.